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Improving the natural and built environment connection in the Blueprint
Improving the natural and built environment connection in the Blueprint

Full Title

Improving the Integration between the Natural and Built Environment within the South Atlantic Conservation Blueprint

Contact

David Rouse
drouse@planning.org

Overview

Urban communities are increasingly shaping the conservation future of the South Atlantic. Major metropolitan areas present both direct threats, such as loss habitat and open space, and indirect threats, such as creating barriers to connectivity. As a result of both these direct and indirect threats,...Urban communities are increasingly shaping the conservation future of the South Atlantic. Major metropolitan areas present both direct threats, such as loss habitat and open space, and indirect threats, such as creating barriers to connectivity. As a result of both these direct and indirect threats, and their scale, metropolitan areas pose a challenge when thinking about corridors and connectivity, and many of the traditional approaches to green infrastructure and conservation are not adequate for urban areas. The Conservation Blueprint (Blueprint) is cross-boundary, cross-organization plan that prioritizes areas for shared conservation action in the South Atlantic. It is designed as a resource for conservation action and investment, which identifies areas for shared action at the ecosystem level. Unfortunately, the quality of current models near and within cities is major barrier for Blueprint users working for and with local governments. Improving these models has been identified as a high priority for Blueprint 2.0 workshop participants, Blueprint users working near and within cities, and the Conservation Design Team. The South Atlantic Landscape Conservation Cooperative (South Atlantic LCC) will engage the American Planning Association (APA) Green Communities Research Center in a scoping project that will examine how large scale green infrastructure definitions and urban scale definitions can be bridged in order to address this challenge and identify areas of shared conservation interest across the rural – urban continuum.

Why Selected

Local governments are increasingly shaping the conservation future of the South Atlantic. Unfortunately, the quality of current models near and within cities is major barrier for Blueprint Users working for, and with, local governments. Improving these models is a high priority for Blueprint 2.0 workshop participants, Blueprint Users working near and within cities, and the Conservation Design Team.

Products

Task 1 - Identify opportunities and challenges to integrating local government green/blue infrastructure efforts with regional approaches like the Conservation Blueprint In Task 1, APA will conduct initial research, collect feedback, and facilitate discussions between urban planners and other conservation professionals. 1.1 APA will perform a scan of existing literature and resources in order to identifying existing regional approaches like Conservation Blueprint, and to identify opportunities and challenges 1.2 APA will collect feedback from planners and other conservation professionals on opportunities and challenges. Approaches may include, but are not limited to, phone interviews, surveys, or on-line meetings (Adobe Connect) 1.3 APA will convene a 3-day Summit of planners and conservation professionals in the South Atlantic Region, informed by findings of tasks 1.1 and 1.2, to discuss opportunities and challenges, collaboration between planners and conservation professionals Task 1 Deliverables: Annotated bibliography, summary report Period of Performance: Months 1-3 Task 2 - Develop an approach to improve Blueprint design near and within cities In task 2, APA will work with the South Atlantic LCC staff to develop an approach to improve Blueprint design near and within cities, drawing on the findings of task 1. 2.1 Work with South Atlantic LCC staff to develop recommended improvements to South Atlantic LCC Urban Open Space Indicator and other potentially related ecosystem indicators 2.2 APA will evaluate other indicators for relationships to the Urban Open Space Indicator and recommend improvements accordingly Task 2 Deliverables: Report on recommended improvements to Urban Open Space Indicator and other potentially related urban ecosystem indicators Period of Performance: Months 3-6 Task 3 - Implement the improved approach to Blueprint Design near and within cities In task 3, APA will work with South Atlantic LCC staff to implement the approach developed in task 2 near and within cities. APA will gather feedback from planners and other Blueprint users on implementation of the improved approach. Task 3 Deliverable: Summary report on implementation of the improved approach Period of Performance: Months 6-11 Task 4 - Evaluate and recommend improvements to the Urban Open Space Indicator and related ecosystem indicators In task 4, APA will evaluate improvements to the Urban Open Space Indicator and related ecosystem indicators based on findings from implementation in task 3. Based on the evaluative findings, APA will recommend improvements to the Urban Open Space Indicator and related ecosystem indicators. Task 4 Deliverable: Summary report on recommended improvements Period of Performance: Months 11-12 Task 5 – Complete a final report In task 5, APA will complete a final report that identifies opportunities and challenges to integrating local government green/blue infrastructure efforts with regional infrastructure approaches like Conservation Blueprint. 5.1 APA will write a final report, drawing on tasks 1-4 5.2 APA will disseminate the report to its approximately 40,000 members using outreach capabilities, including the APA website, APA’s weekly newsletter Interact, and the Sustainable Communities and Regional and Intergovernmental Planning Divisions, as well as directly to APA Chapters in the South Atlantic states Task 5 Deliverable: Final report Period of Performance: Months 13-15  
By |January 21st, 2016|Comments Off on Improving the natural and built environment connection in the Blueprint

Date Started

01/2016

Target Completion

04/2017
SALCC Funded
Terrestrial habitat vulnerability
Terrestrial habitat vulnerability

Full Title

Terrestrial habitat vulnerability

Contact

Rickie White
rickie_white@natureserve.org

Overview

Assess the vulnerability of the approximately 71 ecological systems that exist completely or partially within the South Atlantic and are nested within the 9 South Atlantic LCC ecosystem types. This assessment will be done in a nationally consistent framework to allow comparisons across other LCCs...Assess the vulnerability of the approximately 71 ecological systems that exist completely or partially within the South Atlantic and are nested within the 9 South Atlantic LCC ecosystem types. This assessment will be done in a nationally consistent framework to allow comparisons across other LCCs

Why Selected

Most of the LCC work focuses on the 9 broad ecosystem types of the region. This project helps identify vulnerabilities that may occur in habitat types within each ecosystem. This will help evaluate whether certain habitats fall through the cracks of broader planning approaches and identify some opportunities for improvement

Products

Ready for download

Final report

Project results  Completed 10/2014.  
By |September 20th, 2015|Comments Off on Terrestrial habitat vulnerability

Date Started

09/2013

Target Completion

10/2014
SALCC Funded
Managing instream flows
Managing instream flows

Full Title

Managing instream flows of the SALCC

Contact

Scott Robinson
scott.robinson@dnr.state.ga.us

Overview

The Southeast Aquatic Resource Partnership will direct development of science-based instream flow information for water resource managers and policy makers of the SALCC. The outcome of this project will help inform water resource managers and policy makers about flow requirements of streams, rivers,...The Southeast Aquatic Resource Partnership will direct development of science-based instream flow information for water resource managers and policy makers of the SALCC. The outcome of this project will help inform water resource managers and policy makers about flow requirements of streams, rivers, and estuaries of the SALCC region. It will also identify critical information gaps that must be filled to reduce the uncertainty of streamflow requirements for aquatic ecosystems used by state and federal agencies to protect water resources. Further, the results of this project will include assessments of the likely impacts of climate change to the region’s aquatic resources  Learn more »

Why Selected

This project provides a synthesis of key information needed for developing flow-ecology relationships in the SALCC  

Products

Ready for download

Hydrologic model assessment

Assessment of hydrologic models covering the SALCC  Completed 02/2012.  

Flow ecology literature meta-analysis

Meta-analysis of flow-ecology relationships based on published relationships  Completed 02/2012.  

Flow ecology literature database

Searchable - annotated bibliography of more than 160 citations regarding flow research in the SALCC geography  Completed 02/2012.  

Flow alteration assessment

Assessment of flow alteration threats for NHD+ catchments in the SALCC  Completed 02/2012.  

Regional fish sampling data input in MARIS

Getting SALCC state sampling data into a nationally consistent database (MARIS)  Completed 03/2013.  

Synthesis of aquatic priority areas

Synthesis of existing priority layers for aquatic systems  Completed 10/2012.  

River classification framework

River classification framework for the Southeast US that is consistent with Northeast classification system  Completed 03/2013.
By |September 20th, 2015|Comments Off on Managing instream flows

Date Started

10/2010

Target Completion

03/2013
SALCC Funded
Aquatic connectivity assessment and tool
Aquatic connectivity assessment and tool

Full Title

South Atlantic Aquatic Connectivity Assessment & Tool

Contact

Colin Apse
capse@tnc.org

Overview

This project will build off a current SALCC collaboration with SARP to: 1) Provide a foundational assessment of aquatic connectivity for target aquatic species 2) An online tool to help evaluate and prioritize dam modifications/removal for key species...This project will build off a current SALCC collaboration with SARP to: 1) Provide a foundational assessment of aquatic connectivity for target aquatic species 2) An online tool to help evaluate and prioritize dam modifications/removal for key species

Why Selected

While your cooperative is making progress on terrestrial connectivity, aquatic connectivity and the effects of potential actions to improve that connectivity are still lacking

Products

Ready for download

Connectivity assessment

Assessment of aquatic connectivity based on spatially explicit estimates of small (and large) barriers and their potential to benefit target aquatic species if mitigated throughout the SALCC  Completed 12/2014.  

Web map and tool

A web map will allow users to interact with and download the project datasets - and will include a prioritization tool integrated into the web map that will enable users to run custom scenarios at various scales and for different target species  Completed 12/2014. Coming soon Outreach video about the importance of aquatic connectivity and mentioning the tool
By |September 19th, 2015|Comments Off on Aquatic connectivity assessment and tool

Date Started

01/2013

Target Completion

06/2016
SALCC Funded
Synthesis of high and low marsh mapping
Synthesis of high and low marsh mapping

Full Title

Synthesis of High and Low Marsh Habitat Mapping, Vulnerability and Responses to Sea-Level Rise in the South Atlantic Region

Contact

Tom Allen
allenth@ecu.edu

Overview

This project provides consistent spatial datasets on high and low marsh depicting historic distributions and dynamics, current distributions, and future vulnerability. Project provides estimates for the entire South Atlantic region and additional detailed information for 3 intensive study areas in N...This project provides consistent spatial datasets on high and low marsh depicting historic distributions and dynamics, current distributions, and future vulnerability. Project provides estimates for the entire South Atlantic region and additional detailed information for 3 intensive study areas in NC, SC, and GA.

Why Selected

High and low marsh habitats are already facing the biggest changes from future threats like sea level rise. Improved mapping of these distinct habitat types will provide better predictions for how key coastal zone resources are changing.

Products

In progress

Map of marsh distributions and dynamics

TARGET COMPLETION DATE: 08/2016

Maps generated using a suite of passive remote sensing (balloon- and airplane-based aerial photos and satellite imagery)- active sensing (LiDAR) and field mapping  

Historical marsh mapping

TARGET COMPLETION DATE: 08/2016

Historic high and low marsh boundaries including decadal shifts - vegetation change - migration rates - and phragmites when present  

High and low marsh vulnerability assessment

TARGET COMPLETION DATE: 08/2016

Detailed vulnerability assessment for the three focus areas in NC - SC - GA  

Improved marsh mapping with LiDAR and SAR

TARGET COMPLETION DATE: 08/2016

Improved maps by incorporating SAR and LiDAR for improved resolution and distinction of vegetation
By |September 18th, 2015|Comments Off on Synthesis of high and low marsh mapping

Date Started

01/2013

Target Completion

08/2016
SALCC Funded
Improved urban growth models with smart growth scenarios
Improved urban growth models with smart growth scenarios

Full Title

SMART-SLEUTH: Augmenting the SLEUTH Urban Growth Model with New Smart-Growth Scenario- Building Capabilities

Contact

Ross Meentemeyer
rkmeente@uncc.edu

Overview

This project will build off of current SALCC urban growth models to: 1) Consistent spatial dataset depicting the potential impact of smart growth practices and 2) An online tool to interactively explore the impact of potential growth scenarios across the entire SALCC...This project will build off of current SALCC urban growth models to: 1) Consistent spatial dataset depicting the potential impact of smart growth practices and 2) An online tool to interactively explore the impact of potential growth scenarios across the entire SALCC

Why Selected

Urban growth likely has the largest impact on natural and cultural resources in the SALCC. By incorporating smart growth practices as one scenario in SALCC urban growth models, the cooperative would be able to visualize and evaluate the potential benefits of smart growth policies on natural and cultural resources.

Products

n progress

Modeling framework

TARGET COMPLETION DATE: 02/2016

Develop SMART-SLEUTH - an advanced spatially explicit modeling framework designed to augment the current SLEUTH model with sophisticated smart-growth capabilities.  

Smart growth scenario analysis

TARGET COMPLETION DATE: 02/2016

Conduct scenario analyses to assess the impacts of smart-growth practices in the entire South Atlantic region.
By |September 17th, 2015|Comments Off on Improved urban growth models with smart growth scenarios

Date Started

01/2013

Target Completion

02/2016
SALCC Funded
Sensitivity analysis of landscape and ecological models
Sensitivity analysis of landscape and ecological models

Full Title

Regionalized Sensitivity Analysis and Related Techniques Applied to Landscape and Ecological Response Models

Contact

Ken Reckhow
kenneth.reckhow@cardno.com

Overview

This project will: 1) Integrate SALCC landscape change models and ecological response models, 2) Identify key drivers of change in ecological response models, 3) Assess how potential monitoring and research could be prioritized to reduce major sources of uncertainty (and hence the risk in any decisi...This project will: 1) Integrate SALCC landscape change models and ecological response models, 2) Identify key drivers of change in ecological response models, 3) Assess how potential monitoring and research could be prioritized to reduce major sources of uncertainty (and hence the risk in any decisions informed by the model).

Why Selected

Understanding the biggest drivers of change and the uncertainty in those predictions will be essential in targeting both future research and conservation actions in the SALCC

Products

In progress

Sensitivity analysis of landscape models

TARGET COMPLETION DATE: 11/2014

Identification of the most important variables in linked SALCC landscape and ecological models  

Value of information assessment

TARGET COMPLETION DATE: 11/2014

Value of information assessments (VOIA) will be conducted at each site to assess how proposed monitoring and research programs might reduce uncertainty (and hence the risk in any decisions informed by the model).
By |September 16th, 2015|Comments Off on Sensitivity analysis of landscape and ecological models

Date Started

12/2012

Target Completion

11/2014
SALCC Funded
Estuarine and marine resource maps
Estuarine and marine resource maps

Full Title

Development of Regional Estuarine and Marine Natural Resource Maps for the South Atlantic

Contact

Mary Conley
mconley@tnc.org

Overview

This project will develop consistent spatial datasets depicting seafloor habitats, migratory species (e.g. cetaceans, sea turtles, diadromous fish) distributions, and estuarine and coastal habitats. The project steering committee will be the healthy ecosystems team of the South Atlantic Alliance wit...This project will develop consistent spatial datasets depicting seafloor habitats, migratory species (e.g. cetaceans, sea turtles, diadromous fish) distributions, and estuarine and coastal habitats. The project steering committee will be the healthy ecosystems team of the South Atlantic Alliance with additional members added if needed.

Why Selected

While great progress is being made on terrestrial and freshwater systems, SALCC conservation planning models are being limited by consistent data on estuarine and marine ecosystems. This will help SALCC planning models estimate vulnerability and response to conservation actions for many key coastal and aquatic species.

Products

n progress

GIS data

TARGET COMPLETION DATE: 12/2013

Consistent spatial datasets depicting seafloor habitats - migratory species (e.g. cetaceans - sea turtles - diadromous fish) distributions - and estuarine and coastal habitats
By |September 15th, 2015|Comments Off on Estuarine and marine resource maps

Date Started

10/2012

Target Completion

12/2013
SALCC Funded
Predicting baseline, altered, and future instream flows
Predicting baseline, altered, and future instream flows

Full Title

Demonstration of a Unified Hydrologic Model for Assessing Human and Climate Impacts on Streamflows at Multiple Geographic Scales

Contact

Eloise Kendy
ekendy@tnc.org

Overview

The project predicts baseline instream flows for all NHD+ catchments in the SALCC and altered, and future instream flows based on urban growth and climate change for catchments within 6 HUC6 watersheds....The project predicts baseline instream flows for all NHD+ catchments in the SALCC and altered, and future instream flows based on urban growth and climate change for catchments within 6 HUC6 watersheds.

Why Selected

Water scarcity is a major emerging issue in the South Atlantic and the project will provide a consistent way of predicting the future impacts of land use and water management decisions on the quantity and timing of freshwater flows  

Products

Ready for download

Final report

Final report on project results  Completed 10/2013. In progress

Unaltered flow assessment

TARGET COMPLETION DATE: 05/2014

Access to unaltered flow data for each NHDPlus catchment in SALCC  

Altered flows for select watersheds

TARGET COMPLETION DATE: 05/2014

Access to altered flow data for all NHDPlus segments within the selected watersheds including comparative hydrographs and flow duration curves  

Future flows for select watersheds

TARGET COMPLETION DATE: 05/2014

Access to projected flow data for 2 future scenarios
By |September 14th, 2015|Comments Off on Predicting baseline, altered, and future instream flows

Date Started

09/2012

Target Completion

08/2013
SALCC Funded
Mechanisms of aquatic species invasions
Mechanisms of aquatic species invasions

Full Title

Mechanisms of Aquatic Species Invasions Across the SALCC

Contact

Amy Benson
abenson@usgs.gov

Overview

This project will provide: 1) Predictions of current and future distributions of nonindigenous aquatic species (NAS) and 2) Estimates of the benefits of potential conservation and management strategies. This project builds off of a large national database that tracks nonindigenous aquatic species....This project will provide: 1) Predictions of current and future distributions of nonindigenous aquatic species (NAS) and 2) Estimates of the benefits of potential conservation and management strategies. This project builds off of a large national database that tracks nonindigenous aquatic species.

Why Selected

Changes in human populations and connectivity could potentially have large changes in how, where, and when species invasions occur. These invasions can have major impacts on natural, cultural, and socioeconomic resources and are not incorporated in SALCC planning models.

Products

In progress

Species invasion model

TARGET COMPLETION DATE: 08/2014

Model of the spread of invasive species in the SALCC and use these models to predict future invasion pathways relying on GCM forecasts – SLEUTH - and other Designing Sustainable Landscapes (DSL) products  

Impacts of potential management actions

TARGET COMPLETION DATE: 08/2014

Derive the benefits of potential conservation and management strategies within a formal decision-analytic framework to be developed with SALCC input
By |September 13th, 2015|Comments Off on Mechanisms of aquatic species invasions

Date Started

09/2012

Target Completion

08/2014
SALCC Funded
Resource manager handbook for understanding and using sea level rise models
Resource manager handbook for understanding and using sea level rise models

Full Title

A Handbook for Resource Managers to Understand and Utilize Sea-Level Rise and Coastal Wetland Models for Ecosystem Management under Future Conditions

Contact

Thomas Doyle
doylet@usgs.gov

Overview

A handbook will be constructed from training and feedback sessions with FWS resource staff and other coastal managers (NOAA, NPS) of published decision-support tools and simulation models for sea-level rise and climate change assessments. Various sea-level rise and coastal wetland models have been d...A handbook will be constructed from training and feedback sessions with FWS resource staff and other coastal managers (NOAA, NPS) of published decision-support tools and simulation models for sea-level rise and climate change assessments. Various sea-level rise and coastal wetland models have been developed and applied using different designs and scales of spatial and temporal complexity for predicting habitat and environmental change that have not heretofore been synthesized to aid natural resource managers of their utility and limitations. Some are more accessible as online tools while others require more expert capacity to parameterize and run for any given park, refuge, reserve, or regional application. Training sessions will be conducted with Federal land managers from FWS, NPS, and NOAA across the pan-Gulf and South Atlantic states of the southeastern U.S. to educate and evaluate user needs and understanding of concepts, data, and modeling tools for projecting sea-level rise and its impact on coastal habitats and wildlife. A simplified tabular context will be developed by list of decision-support tools, ecological models, and criteria to distinguish the source, scale, and quality of input information and geographic data sets, physical and biological constraints and relationships, datum characteristics of water and land elevation components, utility options for setting sea-level rise and climate change scenarios, and ease or difficulty of storing, displaying, or interpreting model output. The handbook will provide a layman’s guide to understanding climate change based on a practical synthesis of the current state of knowledge and tools suitable for DOI land management need and facilitating Landscape Conservation Cooperative (LCC) science and conservations initiatives.

Why Selected

As more coastal managers use future predictions in management decisions, non technical descriptions of the strengths and weakness of future change models are becoming increasingly important. This project includes models and coastal managers throughout the entire LCC

Products

In progress

Handbook for using sea level rise models

TARGET COMPLETION DATE: 06/2013

The handbook will provide a layman’s guide to understanding climate change based on a practical synthesis of the current state of knowledge and tools suitable for coastal land management
By |September 12th, 2015|Comments Off on Resource manager handbook for understanding and using sea level rise models

Date Started

07/2012

Target Completion

06/2013
Implications of mangrove migration in Southeast US
Implications of mangrove migration in Southeast US

Full Title

Ecological implications of mangrove forest migration in the southeastern United States

Contact

Mike Osland
oslandm@usgs.gov

Overview

Winter climate change has the potential to have a large impact on coastal wetlands in the southeastern U.S. Warmer winter temperatures and reductions in the intensity of freeze events would likely lead to mangrove forest range expansion and salt marsh displacement in parts of the U.S. Gulf of Mexico...Winter climate change has the potential to have a large impact on coastal wetlands in the southeastern U.S. Warmer winter temperatures and reductions in the intensity of freeze events would likely lead to mangrove forest range expansion and salt marsh displacement in parts of the U.S. Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic coast. The objective of the proposed research is to better evaluate the ecological implications of mangrove forest migration and salt marsh displacement. The potential ecological impacts of mangrove migration are diverse ranging from important biotic impacts (e.g., coastal fisheries, land bird migration; colonial nesting wading birds) to ecosystem stability (e.g., response to sea level rise and drought; habitat loss; coastal protection) to biogeochemical processes (e.g., carbon storage; water quality). The proposed research will investigate the impact of mangrove forest migration on coastal wetland soil processes and the consequent implications for coastal wetland responses to sea level rise and carbon storage

Why Selected

The potential replacement of salt marshes with mangrove forest on the coasts of North Florida, Georgia, and South Carolina due to climate change could have major effects on ecosystem function. This project covers the entire coastal area of the SALCC potentially impacted by mangrove migration

Products

In progress

Assessment of ecosystem impacts

TARGET COMPLETION DATE: 09/2014

Predicted impacts of mangrove forest migration on coastal wetland soil processes and the consequent implications for coastal wetland responses to sea level rise and carbon storage
By |September 11th, 2015|Comments Off on Implications of mangrove migration in Southeast US

Date Started

08/2012

Target Completion

09/2014
Connectivity for Climate Change in the Southeast US
Connectivity for Climate Change in the Southeast US

Full Title

Connectivity for Climate Change in the Southeastern United States

Contact

Nick Haddad
haddad@ncsu.edu

Overview

Climate change is already affecting biodiversity, changing the dates when birds arrive to breed and when flowers bloom in spring, and shifting the ranges of species as they move to cooler places. One problem for wildlife as their ranges shift is that their path is often impeded – their habitats ha...Climate change is already affecting biodiversity, changing the dates when birds arrive to breed and when flowers bloom in spring, and shifting the ranges of species as they move to cooler places. One problem for wildlife as their ranges shift is that their path is often impeded – their habitats have become fragmented by agriculture and urbanization, presenting barriers to their migration. Because of this, the most common recommended strategy to protect wildlife as climate changes is to connect their habitats, providing them safe passage. There are great challenges to implementing this strategy in the southeastern U.S., however, because most intervening lands between habitat patches are held in private ownership. We will combine data on key wildlife species and their habitats throughout the southeastern U.S. with new computer modeling technologies that allow us to identify key connections that will be robust to regional and global changes in climate and land use

Why Selected

This project builds off existing terrestrial connectivity work in the SALCC and Peninsular FL LCC to produce a consistent estimate of key corridors throughout the southeast in the face of future change (climate, sea level rise, urban growth, etc)

Products

In progress

Maps of key corridors

TARGET COMPLETION DATE: 09/2014

GIS layers of key corridors that are robust to climate and land use change
By |September 10th, 2015|Comments Off on Connectivity for Climate Change in the Southeast US

Date Started

08/2012

Target Completion

09/2014
Assessing climate-sensitive ecosystems in the southeast US
Assessing climate-sensitive ecosystems in the southeast US

Full Title

Assessing climate-sensitive ecosystems in the southeastern United States

Contact

Jaime Collazo
jaime_collazo@ncsu.edu

Overview

This study will develop a regional synthesis of the types, geographic distribution and controls, scientific understanding, and conservation status of spatially discrete endemic or disjunct ecosystems whose hydrology, soils, or physiography make them especially sensitive to shifts in regional precipi...This study will develop a regional synthesis of the types, geographic distribution and controls, scientific understanding, and conservation status of spatially discrete endemic or disjunct ecosystems whose hydrology, soils, or physiography make them especially sensitive to shifts in regional precipitation or temperature throughout the Southeast and the Caribbean. We will synthesize existing information on current threats, climate change impacts, and the capacity of these ecosystems to adapt to climate change. We will combine data from ecological and geographic databases, scientific literature, technical reports, and expert knowledge to assess climate affects.

Why Selected

This project covers the entire terrestrial portion of the SALCC and synthesizes the current understanding of how climate change will affect our most sensitive ecosystems

Products

In progress

Climate vulnerability assessment for ecosystems

TARGET COMPLETION DATE: 09/2013

Synthesis of existing information on current threats - climate change impacts - and the capacity of these ecosystems to adapt to climate change
By |September 9th, 2015|Comments Off on Assessing climate-sensitive ecosystems in the southeast US

Date Started

07/2012

Target Completion

09/2013
Communicating uncertainty
Communicating uncertainty

Full Title

Communicating and Using Uncertain Scientific Information in the Production of ‘Actionable Science’

Contact

Brian Irwin
irwin@uga.edu

Overview

Conservation practitioners must navigate many challenges to advance effective natural-resource management in the presence of multiple uncertainties. Numerous climatic and ecological changes remain on the horizon, and their eventual consequences are not completely understood. Even so, their influence...Conservation practitioners must navigate many challenges to advance effective natural-resource management in the presence of multiple uncertainties. Numerous climatic and ecological changes remain on the horizon, and their eventual consequences are not completely understood. Even so, their influences are expected to impact important resources and the people that depend on them across local, regional, and sometimes global scales. Although forecasts of future conditions are almost always imperfect, decision makers are increasingly expected to communicate and use uncertain information when making policy choices that affect multiple user groups. The degree to which management objectives are met can depend on 1) how critical uncertainties are identified and accounted for, and 2) effective communication among user groups, scientists, and resource managers. The objective of this project is to help facilitate strategic decision support and synthesize the state of the science related to communicating and using uncertain information in conservation decision making. By providing a forum on the communication of scientific uncertainty, we aim to traverse traditional disciplinary boundaries, with a focus on climate change in the southeastern United States. We expect this process to generate transferable guidance that will directly assist resource managers across agencies to identify common goals and shared research priorities

Why Selected

Given the "forward looking" focus of the SALCC understanding how to communicate the uncertainty in future projections will be particularly important

Products

In progress

Guidance on communicating uncertainty

TARGET COMPLETION DATE: 06/2013

Guidance on communicating uncertainty based on a synthesis of the state of the science related to communicating and using uncertain information in conservation decision making
By |September 8th, 2015|Comments Off on Communicating uncertainty

Date Started

08/2012

Target Completion

06/2013
Optimal conservation strategies to respond to future change
Optimal conservation strategies to respond to future change

Full Title

Optimal Conservation Strategies to Cope with Climate Change

Contact

Barry Grand
grandjb@auburn.edu

Overview

Develop a framework to help partners identify how natural and cultural resources will be vulnerable to future change (climate, urban growth) and where to take action to sustain those resources across the South Atlantic LCC Learn more »...Develop a framework to help partners identify how natural and cultural resources will be vulnerable to future change (climate, urban growth) and where to take action to sustain those resources across the South Atlantic LCC Learn more »

Why Selected

This project seeks to develop a conservation planning framework for the SALCC

Products

In progress

Prototype maps

TARGET COMPLETION DATE: 01/2013

Prototype GIS maps depicting priority places - actions - and potential times for actions to sustain natural and cultural resources in the face of future change  

Revised maps

TARGET COMPLETION DATE: 01/2014

Revised GIS maps depicting priority places - actions - and potential times for actions to sustain natural and cultural resources in the face of future change
By |September 7th, 2015|Comments Off on Optimal conservation strategies to respond to future change

Date Started

10/2011

Target Completion

09/2013
SALCC Funded
Genetic “hotspots” in the SALCC
Genetic “hotspots” in the SALCC

Full Title

Identifying priority areas for land protection in the South Atlantic: a landscape genetics pilot study

Contact

Greg Moyer
Greg_Moyer@fws.gov

Overview

Identifies genetic “hotspots” for sustaining populations and maintaining within-species adaptive capacity throughout the LCC. Evaluates the overlap between these genetic “hotspots” and current priority conservation areas. Creates an automated tool to update genetic “hotspots” as new data...Identifies genetic “hotspots” for sustaining populations and maintaining within-species adaptive capacity throughout the LCC. Evaluates the overlap between these genetic “hotspots” and current priority conservation areas. Creates an automated tool to update genetic “hotspots” as new data become available. Learn more »

Why Selected

This project will help SALCC conservation planning better inform terrestrial and aquatic decision making by identifying important areas for maintaining genetically viable populations and the adaptive capacity for species to respond to future change

Products

Ready for download

Report on genetic "hotspots"

Detailed report on genetic "hotspots" based on patterns of intraspecific genetic diversity and divergence  Completed 03/2013. In progress

GIS layer of genetic "hotspots"

TARGET COMPLETION DATE: 03/2013

GIS layer of genetic "hotspots" based on patterns of intraspecific genetic diversity and divergence
By |September 6th, 2015|Comments Off on Genetic “hotspots” in the SALCC

Date Started

09/2011

Target Completion

03/2013
SALCC Funded
Effects of sea level rise on beach nesting species
Effects of sea level rise on beach nesting species

Full Title

Effects of sea level rise on sea turtle, shorebird, seabird, and beach mouse nesting distributions within the South Atlantic region

Contact

Betsy Von Holle
vonholle@ucf.edu

Overview

Links long-term survey data for four species of sea turtle, three species of shorebird, five species of seabird, and two beach mouse species to maps of coastal sea level rise vulnerability to understand the effects of sea level rise on population viability and socioeconomic resources. The coastal st...Links long-term survey data for four species of sea turtle, three species of shorebird, five species of seabird, and two beach mouse species to maps of coastal sea level rise vulnerability to understand the effects of sea level rise on population viability and socioeconomic resources. The coastal study areas include nesting beaches from North Carolina south to Melbourne, Florida. Learn more »

Why Selected

This project will help LCC conservation planning better inform coastal decision making by evaluating the impact of sea level rise on beach nesting species and socioeconomic resources

Products

In progress

Habitat suitability maps

TARGET COMPLETION DATE: 10/2013

Habitat suitability maps for 14 coastal nesting species (based on density of nests - nesting pairs - or burrows)  

Vulnerability of suitable habitat to sea level rise

TARGET COMPLETION DATE: 10/2013

Integration of coastal vulnerability to sea level rise with habitat suitability maps  

Socioeconomic cost of beach species vulnerability and benefits of adaptation

TARGET COMPLETION DATE: 10/2013

Socioeconomic costs of the effects of sea level rise and storm surges on coastal nesting species and the socioeconomic benefits of adaptation strategies
By |September 5th, 2015|Comments Off on Effects of sea level rise on beach nesting species

Date Started

09/2011

Target Completion

10/2013
SALCC Funded
Priority amphibian and reptile conservation areas for the South Atlantic
Priority amphibian and reptile conservation areas for the South Atlantic

Full Title

Determining priority amphibian and reptile conservation areas for the South Atlantic Region, and assessing their efficacy for cross-taxa conservation

Contact

Joseph J. Apodaca
japodaca@bio.fsu.edu

Overview

Identifies areas throughout the LCC needed to sustain amphibian and reptile populations in the face of future change. Evaluates the abilities of these areas to sustain populations of other non amphibian and reptiles species. L...Identifies areas throughout the LCC needed to sustain amphibian and reptile populations in the face of future change. Evaluates the abilities of these areas to sustain populations of other non amphibian and reptiles species. Learn more »

Why Selected

This project will help LCC conservation planning better inform decision making in terrestrial and aquatic systems by providing species response models and core areas needed for sustaining amphibian and reptile populations.

Products

In progress

Species distribution models

TARGET COMPLETION DATE: 03/2014

Fine scaled species distribution models for key amphibians and reptiles  

Priority amphibian and reptile conservation area (PARCA) locations

TARGET COMPLETION DATE: 03/2014

GIS layers of priority areas for conserving amphibians and reptiles  

Climate and urban growth threats to to PARCAs

TARGET COMPLETION DATE: 03/2014

Assessment of the threats of urban growth and climate change to PARCAs  

Overlap of PARCAs with other resources

TARGET COMPLETION DATE: 03/2014

Assessment of overlap of PARCAs with important areas for other taxa and cultural resources  
By |September 4th, 2015|Comments Off on Priority amphibian and reptile conservation areas for the South Atlantic

Date Started

07/2011

Target Completion

03/2014
SALCC Funded
Terrestrial habitat connectivity
Terrestrial habitat connectivity

Full Title

Identifying and prioritizing key habitat connectivity areas for the South Atlantic Region

Contact

Ron Sutherland
rws10@duke.edu

Overview

This project: 1) Maps out current and future levels of habitat connectivity in the South Atlantic region, from the standpoint of multiple groups of terrestrial wildlife species and 2) Prioritizes key corridors and linkage areas based on their relative importance and centrality within the overall hab...This project: 1) Maps out current and future levels of habitat connectivity in the South Atlantic region, from the standpoint of multiple groups of terrestrial wildlife species and 2) Prioritizes key corridors and linkage areas based on their relative importance and centrality within the overall habitat network and their relative influence on the viability of target wildlife populations Learn more »

Why Selected

This project will help LCC conservation planning better inform terrestrial conservation planning and corridor design by identifying key areas for habitat connectivity and providing models for how large ranging species may respond to future changes in connectivity

Products

In progress

Current and future connectivity

TARGET COMPLETION DATE: 03/2014

GIS layers of current and future levels of habitat connectivity in the South Atlantic region from the perspective of multiple groups of terrestrial species  

Prioritization of habitat connections

TARGET COMPLETION DATE: 03/2014

Prioritization of key corridors and linkage areas based on their relative importance and centrality within the overall habitat network and their relative influence on the viability of target wildlife populations
By |September 3rd, 2015|Comments Off on Terrestrial habitat connectivity

Date Started

07/2011

Target Completion

03/2014
SALCC Funded
Integration natural and culture resources in the South Atlantic
Integration natural and culture resources in the South Atlantic

Full Title

Identifying and Integrating Optimal Cultural and Natural Sustainability Strategies For the South Atlantic Region

Contact

Steven Smith
SMITHS@mailbox.sc.edu

Overview

An assessment of current distribution of cultural resources, cultural resource sustainability strategies, and the potential for integrating natural and cultural resource sustainability strategies in the South Atlantic LCC region An assessment of current distribution of cultural resources, cultural resource sustainability strategies, and the potential for integrating natural and cultural resource sustainability strategies in the South Atlantic LCC region Learn more »

Why Selected

This project will help LCC conservation planning better integrate natural and cultural resources in decision making by integrating existing cultural resource data and identifying potential areas of overlap between natural and cultural resource management strategies.

Products

Ready for download

Literature review

Literature review of cultural resource sustainability strategies  Completed 09/2012.  

Action plan

Action plan for integrating natural and cultural resource sustainability strategies  Completed 09/2012. In progress

Compilation of cultural resource data

TARGET COMPLETION DATE: 09/2012

Compilation of cultural resource GIS data for the South Atlantic region
By |September 2nd, 2015|Comments Off on Integration natural and culture resources in the South Atlantic

Date Started

07/2011

Target Completion

08/2012
SALCC Funded
Seamless LiDAR coverage for SALCC
Seamless LiDAR coverage for SALCC

Full Title

Seamless LiDAR coverage for SALCC

Contact

Doug Newcomb
doug_newcomb@fws.gov

Overview

Merging LiDAR data sets throughout the South Atlantic LCC to create a consistent layer of elevation, canopy cover, and solar irradiance....Merging LiDAR data sets throughout the South Atlantic LCC to create a consistent layer of elevation, canopy cover, and solar irradiance.

Why Selected

LiDAR data is a key data source for predicting current and future ecosystem conditions (e.g., sea level rise, locations of small isolated wetlands, etc). This project is coordinator with other efforts in the region (USGS, NOAA) to produce a seamless LiDAR layer for the SALCC

Products

In progress

Seamless LiDAR layer

TARGET COMPLETION DATE: UNDEFINED/UNDEFINED

Seamless and consistent GIS layer of Lidar derived layers
By |September 1st, 2015|Comments Off on Seamless LiDAR coverage for SALCC

Date Started

12/2010

Target Completion

01/1970
SALCC Funded
Enhancing the utility of International Shorebird Survey data management
Enhancing the utility of International Shorebird Survey data management

Full Title

Enhancing the utility of International Shorebird Survey data management

Contact

Brad Andres
Brad_Andres@fws.gov

Overview

Increase the utility of the International Shorebird Survey for making management and conservation decisions by creating a single, effective data management system. Learn more »...Increase the utility of the International Shorebird Survey for making management and conservation decisions by creating a single, effective data management system. Learn more »

Why Selected

Lack of consistent data management has hindered a number of regional modeling efforts in the South Atlantic. This project is designed to help improve data management for shorebirds throughout the SALCC.

Products

Ready for download

Updated data portal

Improved data portal with new information and data entry backlog cleared  Completed 06/2012.
By |August 30th, 2015|Comments Off on Enhancing the utility of International Shorebird Survey data management

Date Started

10/2010

Target Completion

10/2012
SALCC Funded
Impact of sea level rise on marshbirds
Impact of sea level rise on marshbirds

Full Title

Coastal Wetland Dynamics and Wildlife Populations: Modeling the Effects of Sea Level Rise and Landscape Change

Contact

Tim Jones
tim_jones@fws.gov

Overview

Assess the potential impacts of sea level rise on coastal ecosystems and related wildlife resources. Develop a Bayesian Belief network that projects the impact of sea level rise on coastal wetland habitats. Develop marshbird habitat models using a Bayesian hierarchical framework and integrate physic...Assess the potential impacts of sea level rise on coastal ecosystems and related wildlife resources. Develop a Bayesian Belief network that projects the impact of sea level rise on coastal wetland habitats. Develop marshbird habitat models using a Bayesian hierarchical framework and integrate physical parameters and estimates of coastal wetland change to predict future land use change in terms of species distribution

Why Selected

Understanding the impacts of sea level rise of key coastal species will particular important in developing overall adaptation strategies. This project develops predicting marshbird models that cover the entire SALCC

Products

In progress

Models of sea level rise impacts on marshbirds

TARGET COMPLETION DATE: 12/2013

Final models of the potential impact of sea level rise on coastal ecosystems and marshbirds for the Southeast and Mid-Atlantic
By |August 28th, 2015|Comments Off on Impact of sea level rise on marshbirds

Date Started

09/2010

Target Completion

12/2013
SALCC Funded
2010 priority aquatic research in SALCC
2010 priority aquatic research in SALCC

Full Title

Priority aquatic research within SALCC

Contact

Mary Freeman
mary@ttrout.ecology.uga.edu

Overview

Addressing several priority information needs relevant to aquatic conservation in 2010, including: 1) Relationships between hydrology/water use and ecological response, 2) Predictive models for species ranges, and 3) Priority species habitat relationship...Addressing several priority information needs relevant to aquatic conservation in 2010, including: 1) Relationships between hydrology/water use and ecological response, 2) Predictive models for species ranges, and 3) Priority species habitat relationship

Why Selected

This project was supported by the SALCC in 2010 to address key aquatic research needs

Products

In progress

Chattahoochee fish occurrence models

TARGET COMPLETION DATE: 12/2011

Species-occurrence models for all fishes that occur commonly in Chattahoochee River system streams  

Robust redhorse river segment assessment

TARGET COMPLETION DATE: 12/2012

Geomorphic characterization of river segments used for spawning by Robust Redhorse and relevance to management and reintroduction strategies for Robust Redhorse  

Species-flow models for Apalachicola basin

TARGET COMPLETION DATE: 08/2013

Species-flow alteration relations based on fine-resolution metapopulation models for fishes and mussels in the Apalachicola basin
By |August 26th, 2015|Comments Off on 2010 priority aquatic research in SALCC

Date Started

09/2010

Target Completion

08/2013
SALCC Funded
Monitoring waterbirds for effective management
Monitoring waterbirds for effective management

Full Title

Monitoring waterbirds for effective management

Contact

John Stanton
John_Stanton@fws.gov

Overview

Sustaining healthy populations of waterbirds that migrate long distances (waterfowl, shorebirds, and wading birds) is a major challenge for land managers. How does a manager know which species to manage for at a specific site? How important is a single site in the big picture? How can many managers ...Sustaining healthy populations of waterbirds that migrate long distances (waterfowl, shorebirds, and wading birds) is a major challenge for land managers. How does a manager know which species to manage for at a specific site? How important is a single site in the big picture? How can many managers coordinate their actions across the landscape so that the birds have the right amount and quality of habitat, at the right time, in the right places? These questions are difficult to answer without understanding how all the pieces fit together. Managers and scientists are working together in a new project to understand and optimally manage conservation lands along the Atlantic and Mississippi Flyways to support continental populations of waterbirds. They are using adaptive management and modeling in an innovative way that incorporates their management expertise as well as new conservation planning and modeling tools.  Learn more »

Why Selected

This project seeks to understand how to sustain healthy populations of waterbirds that migrate long distances through linked decisions at local, regional, and flyway scales

Products

Ready for download

Monitoring protocols

Sampling protocols for integrated waterbird monitoring in the Atlantic and Mississippi flyways  Completed 08/2011. In progress

Decision support models

TARGET COMPLETION DATE: 09/2014

Decision support tools for waterbird management at local - regional - and flyway scales
By |August 25th, 2015|Comments Off on Monitoring waterbirds for effective management

Date Started

08/2010

Target Completion

09/2014
SALCC Funded
Landscape models for endemic Tar river mussels
Landscape models for endemic Tar river mussels

Full Title

Hierarchical landscape models for endemic unionid mussels

Contact

Tom Augspurger
tom_augspurger@fws.gov

Overview

The specific objectives of this project are to a) assemble existing mussel, water quality, and landscape level (e.g., GIS) data bases; b) conduct expert interviews, targeted mussel surveys, and habitat assessments; c) develop an integrated model to predict species occupancy and to identify specific ...The specific objectives of this project are to a) assemble existing mussel, water quality, and landscape level (e.g., GIS) data bases; b) conduct expert interviews, targeted mussel surveys, and habitat assessments; c) develop an integrated model to predict species occupancy and to identify specific stream segments for conservation, restoration, and augmentation; and d) validate and refine the model for applicability to other species and geographic regions. Results of this project will be used to develop scientifically defensible estimates of the stream network needing conservation to support mussel recovery; identify specific factors limiting recovery of federally-listed mussels in a watershed manner; enable predictions and hypothesis testing associated with mussel occupancy and distribution associated with changes in habitat (degradation or restoration) at the instream, riparian, or watershed spatial scales; and refine sampling strategies for rare mussels.

Why Selected

This project is a pilot study to assess techniques for incorporating expert opinion into conservation planning for imperiled aquatic species  

Products

In progress

Mussel models and priority stream corridors

TARGET COMPLETION DATE: 09/2013

Data and information for predicting target Mussel species occupancy - probability of conservation success - and identification of high priority stream conservation corridors  

Papers on models and priority stream corridors

TARGET COMPLETION DATE: 09/2013

Publication of 1-2 peer-reviewed scientific articles related to predictions of target Mussel species occupancy - probability of conservation success - and identification of high priority stream conservation corridors
By |August 24th, 2015|Comments Off on Landscape models for endemic Tar river mussels

Date Started

07/2010

Target Completion

09/2013
SALCC Funded
Modeling and experimental assessment of sea level rise adaptation
Modeling and experimental assessment of sea level rise adaptation

Full Title

Modeling and Experimental Research to Guide Management of Community Adaptations in the South Atlantic Coastal Plain in Response to Climate Change and Sea Level Rise

Contact

Clint Moore
cmoore@warnell.uga.edu

Overview

This project will create an inventory of community types (such as vegetation and terrestrial vertebrate species) in coastal plain habitats using GIS; assess and predict climate change and sea level rise impacts on species and communities; and engage in experimental evaluation of management strategie...This project will create an inventory of community types (such as vegetation and terrestrial vertebrate species) in coastal plain habitats using GIS; assess and predict climate change and sea level rise impacts on species and communities; and engage in experimental evaluation of management strategies for landscapes and species of concern for Virginia, North Carolina, Georgia, South Carolina and Florida.

Why Selected

Experimental assessments of adaptation methods to respond to sea level rise are rare in the SALCC region. The project develops key models of coastal response and experimentally assesses potential adaptation strategies in regions throughout the SALCC

Products

In progress

Models of coastal species

TARGET COMPLETION DATE: 09/2014

Spatial models of distribution of key coastal zone species in response to climate change and sea-level rise induced landscape change  

Result of experimental manipulation

TARGET COMPLETION DATE: 09/2014

Results of experimental manipulation of interior/upland habitats to assess potential use by species displaced due to climate-induced landscape change
By |August 24th, 2015|Comments Off on Modeling and experimental assessment of sea level rise adaptation

Date Started

08/2010

Target Completion

09/2014
SALCC Funded
Climate change effects on fish and mussels in the ACF
Climate change effects on fish and mussels in the ACF

Full Title

Multi-resolution assessment of potential climate change effects of aquatic resources

Contact

Mary Freeman
mary@ttrout.ecology.uga.edu

Overview

Multi-scale modeling capabilities for forecasting climate change effects on stream fishes and mussels  Learn more »  ...Multi-scale modeling capabilities for forecasting climate change effects on stream fishes and mussels  Learn more »  

Why Selected

This project was supported by the SALCC as a pilot to address how to model the effects of climate and land use change on aquatic species.  

Products

In progress

Coarse resolution models

TARGET COMPLETION DATE: 10/2014

Coarse-resolution models for identifying where large climate change effects on fish and mussel species are most probable - and which species are most vulnerable in a single basin  

Fine resolution models

TARGET COMPLETION DATE: 10/2014

Fine-resolution models for simulating metapopulation responses to climate change - land use change - and alternative management actions - with identification of monitoring and research most needed to reduce management uncertainty in a single basin
By |August 23rd, 2015|Comments Off on Climate change effects on fish and mussels in the ACF

Date Started

10/2009

Target Completion

10/2014
SALCC Funded
Designing sustainable landscapes
Designing sustainable landscapes

Full Title

Designing sustainable landscapes

Contact

Steve Williams
steve_williams@ncsu.edu

Overview

This project will provide the habitat dynamics and priority bird species response models that will serve as the basis for a detailed regional assessment of priority species habitats. We will develop region-wide projections of urban growth and habitat dynamics models for priority species from 2001 to...This project will provide the habitat dynamics and priority bird species response models that will serve as the basis for a detailed regional assessment of priority species habitats. We will develop region-wide projections of urban growth and habitat dynamics models for priority species from 2001 to 2100. The work will be staged to provide urban growth and sea-level-rise models first and detailed habitat and species models later.  Learn more »  

Why Selected

This project is developing key predictions of landscape change and bird response that are being integrated into a variety of SALCC resource response models  

Products

Ready for download

Future landscape predictions for the coastal plain

Series of maps representing projected landscape condition based on urbanization - climate change - and vegetation dynamics models through 2100  Completed 05/2012.  

Bird response models for future landscape in coastal plain

Priority species response models to predicted landscape change through 2100  Completed 05/2012.  

Bird response models for future landscape in the piedmont

Priority species response models to predicted landscape change through 2100  Completed 12/2013.  

Urban growth and sea level rise models

Models of urban growth and sea level rise for the piedmont and coastal plain  Completed 05/2012. In progress

Future landscape predictions for the piedmont

TARGET COMPLETION DATE: 12/2013

Series of maps representing projected landscape condition based on urbanization - climate change - and vegetation dynamics models through 2100
By |August 23rd, 2015|Comments Off on Designing sustainable landscapes

Date Started

04/2010

Target Completion

12/2013
SALCC Funded
Past and future bird range shifts
Past and future bird range shifts

Full Title

Patch and range dynamics of North American avian species in response to land use patterns and climatic change in Southeastern US

Contact

Jaime Collazo
jaime_collazo@ncsu.edu

Overview

This project predicts the effect of land use change and climate change on selected bird populations at the level of Bird Conservation Regions and states for the SEAFWA region.  Learn more »  ...This project predicts the effect of land use change and climate change on selected bird populations at the level of Bird Conservation Regions and states for the SEAFWA region.  Learn more »  

Why Selected

Land use and climate change are both predicted to have large impact of future bird distributions. This project provides key information on range shifts that covers the terrestrial portion of the SALCC  

Products

Ready for download

New modeling method for BBS data

Manuscript describing new methodology for using BBS data for occupancy modeling  Completed 10/2010. In progress

Modeling software

TARGET COMPLETION DATE: 06/2013

Software to model the influence of land use change and climate change on range dynamics of birds adequately sampled by the BBS  

Predicts of past and future bird distributions

TARGET COMPLETION DATE: 06/2012

Manuscript describing historical range dynamics of selected species and predictions for mid-term future
By |August 22nd, 2015|Comments Off on Past and future bird range shifts

Date Started

10/2009

Target Completion

06/2013
SALCC Funded
EnviroAtlas of ecosystem services
EnviroAtlas of ecosystem services

Full Title

EnviroAtlas of ecosystem services

Contact

Anne Neale
neale.Anne@epamail.epa.gov

Overview

The EnviroAtlas is a web-based, easy-to-use, mapping application that allows users to view and analyze multiple ecosystem services in a specific region. The maps will provide users with an ability to assess data on: - Clean and adequate water for drinking and domestic use - Clean water for recreatio...The EnviroAtlas is a web-based, easy-to-use, mapping application that allows users to view and analyze multiple ecosystem services in a specific region. The maps will provide users with an ability to assess data on: - Clean and adequate water for drinking and domestic use - Clean water for recreation and aquatic habitat - Food fuel and fiber –Recreation cultural and aesthetic amenities - Climate regulation (e.g. carbon storage to off-set greenhouse gases) - Protection from hazardous weather - Habitat and the maintenance of biodiversity - Clean air  Learn more »  

Why Selected

The national effort covers the entire SALCC and will provide much needed spatial information on a variety of ecosystem services  

Products

In progress

Web portal

TARGET COMPLETION DATE: 01/2013

First public release of web portal with annual updates thereafter
By |August 21st, 2015|Comments Off on EnviroAtlas of ecosystem services

Date Started

12/2008

Target Completion

01/2013
Southern Forest Futures
Southern Forest Futures

Full Title

Southern Forest Futures

Contact

Dave Wear
dwear@fed.fs.us

Overview

The Southern Forest Futures Project will analyze and forecast potential changes in the forests of the U.S. South and implications for their sustainability. The overall goal of the SFFP is to inform management choices, policy discussions, and science programs with the clearest possible understanding ...The Southern Forest Futures Project will analyze and forecast potential changes in the forests of the U.S. South and implications for their sustainability. The overall goal of the SFFP is to inform management choices, policy discussions, and science programs with the clearest possible understanding of the potential long term implications of changes in southern forests.  Learn more »  

Why Selected

This project predicts major changes in forest systems for the entire SALCC  

Products

Ready for download

Southeast wide report

Report of forest changes for the entire Southeast region  Completed 05/2011. In progress

Regional assessments and data

TARGET COMPLETION DATE: 02/2013

Ecoregional assessments with in the Southeast and associated project data
By |August 21st, 2015|Comments Off on Southern Forest Futures

Date Started

06/2009

Target Completion

02/2013
Downscaled climate predictions
Downscaled climate predictions

Full Title

Developing Regionally Downscaled Probabilistic Climate Change Projections

Contact

Adam Terando
adam_terando@ncsu.edu

Overview

Downscaled climate change projections of climate variables most relevant to range and habitat dynamics using ensemble predictions from an Earth Model of Intermediate Complexity and IPCC projections for future emission scenarios. ...Downscaled climate change projections of climate variables most relevant to range and habitat dynamics using ensemble predictions from an Earth Model of Intermediate Complexity and IPCC projections for future emission scenarios.  Learn more »  

Why Selected

Provides downscaled climate change predictions for the entire U.S.  

Products

Ready for download

Climate derivatives portal

Online access to climate predictions  Completed 02/2012.
By |August 20th, 2015|Comments Off on Downscaled climate predictions

Date Started

03/2009

Target Completion

01/1970
SALCC Funded
Water Supply Stress Index Model (WaSSI)
Water Supply Stress Index Model (WaSSI)

Full Title

Water Supply Stress Index Model (WaSSI)

Contact

Peter Caldwell
peter_caldwell@ncsu.edu

Overview

WaSSI can predict how climate, land cover, and human population change may impact water availability and carbon sequestration at the watershed level and across the lower 48 United States and Mexico. WaSSI users can select and adjust temperature, precipitation, land cover, and water use factors to si...WaSSI can predict how climate, land cover, and human population change may impact water availability and carbon sequestration at the watershed level and across the lower 48 United States and Mexico. WaSSI users can select and adjust temperature, precipitation, land cover, and water use factors to simulate an unlimited number of global change scenarios for user-determined timeframes through 2100. Simulation results are available as downloadable maps, graphs, and data files that users can apply to their unique information and project needs.   Learn more »  

Why Selected

WaSSI provides consistent predictions of the impact of landscape changes on water and carbon across a large international region  

Products

Ready for download

Online tool version 2.0

WaSSI users can select and adjust temperature - precipitation - land cover - and water use factors to simulate an unlimited number of global change scenarios for user-determined timeframes through 2100  Completed 07/2012.
By |August 19th, 2015|Comments Off on Water Supply Stress Index Model (WaSSI)

Date Started

03/2008

Target Completion

01/1970
Social vulnerability and climate change in the Southeast US
Social vulnerability and climate change in the Southeast US

Full Title

Social vulnerability and climate change in the Southeastern US

Contact

Patrick Scully
pscully@oxfamamerica.org

Overview

Depicts county level predictions of social vulnerability to climate change based on research conducted by The Hazards and Vulnerability Research Institute, Department of Geography, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC.  Learn more »Depicts county level predictions of social vulnerability to climate change based on research conducted by The Hazards and Vulnerability Research Institute, Department of Geography, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC.  Learn more »

Why Selected

This project covers the entire LCC and provides predictions of social vulnerability to climate change hazards like drought, flooding, sea level rise

Products

Ready for download

Social vulnerability interactive map

Interactive map depicting social vulnerability to climate change  Completed 10/2009.
By |August 18th, 2015|Comments Off on Social vulnerability and climate change in the Southeast US

Date Started

01/1970

Target Completion

10/2009
National assessment of fish habitat condition
National assessment of fish habitat condition

Full Title

National assessment of fish habitat condition

Contact

Tom Busiahn
Tom_Busiahn@fws.gov

Overview

As part of the National Fish Habitat Action Plan, a national assessment of fish habitat conditions for the rivers and estuaries of the coterminous 48 states As part of the National Fish Habitat Action Plan, a national assessment of fish habitat conditions for the rivers and estuaries of the coterminous 48 states  Learn more »  

Why Selected

Provides a consistent assessment of fish habitat condition across the entire US

Products

Ready for download

Assessment of fish habitat condition

Assessment of fish habitat condition  Completed 10/2010.
By |August 16th, 2015|Comments Off on National assessment of fish habitat condition

Date Started

03/2006

Target Completion

01/1970
Marine Mammal, Marine Turtle, and Seabird Abundance and Spatial Distribution
Marine Mammal, Marine Turtle, and Seabird Abundance and Spatial Distribution

Full Title

A Comprehensive Assessment of Marine Mammal, Marine Turtle, and Seabird Abundance and Spatial Distribution in U.S. Waters of the western North Atlantic Ocean

Contact

Melanie Steinkamp
melanie_steinkamp@fws.gov

Overview

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Minerals Management Service (MMS), U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) and the US Navy propose to develop models and associated tools to provide seasonal, spatially-explicit density estimates of marine mammals, turtles and seabirds in the ...The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Minerals Management Service (MMS), U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) and the US Navy propose to develop models and associated tools to provide seasonal, spatially-explicit density estimates of marine mammals, turtles and seabirds in the western North Atlantic Ocean  Learn more »

Why Selected

This large scale collaboration will provide consistent predictions of abundance and distribution for marine species in US waters across the entire Atlantic  

Products

n progress

Marine species seasonal abundance and density

TARGET COMPLETION DATE: 07/2014

Estimates of seasonal population abundance and density within surveyed areas  

Changes in marine species distribution and abundance

TARGET COMPLETION DATE: 07/2014

Comparisons between contemporary and historical abundance and distribution
By |August 15th, 2015|Comments Off on Marine Mammal, Marine Turtle, and Seabird Abundance and Spatial Distribution

Date Started

03/2010

Target Completion

07/2014
Template for assessing climate change impacts and management options
Template for assessing climate change impacts and management options

Full Title

Template for Assessing Climate Change Impacts and Management Options

Contact

Emrys Treasure
etreasure@fs.fed.us

Overview

TACCIMO is a web-based tool developed by the USDA Forest Service that connects federal, state, and private land managers and planners to current climate change science. The overarching goal is to provide land and resource managers with the best available science they need to effectively and efficien...TACCIMO is a web-based tool developed by the USDA Forest Service that connects federal, state, and private land managers and planners to current climate change science. The overarching goal is to provide land and resource managers with the best available science they need to effectively and efficiently sustain forests and the services they provide under a changing climate . Learn more »

Why Selected

This tools is regularly updated with the latest peer reviewed climate science information for the South Atlantic, Southeast US, and the entire nation.  

Products

Ready for download

Literature explorer

A searchable repository of climate change effects and management options derived from peer reviewed literature  Completed 12/2012.  

Forest plan explorer

A forest plan explorer that enables review and keyword filtering of forest plan components  Completed 12/2012.  

GIS viewer

A geospatial mapping application that enables the review of climate data  Completed 12/2012.
By |August 14th, 2015|Comments Off on Template for assessing climate change impacts and management options

Date Started

01/1970

Target Completion

12/2012
National assessment of fish habitat, land use, and climate
National assessment of fish habitat, land use, and climate

Full Title

National assessment of fish habitat, land use, and climate

Contact

N/A

Overview

National, regional, and local assessment connecting climate and land use change to future conditions of fish habitat. Supported by NFHAP.  Learn more »  ...National, regional, and local assessment connecting climate and land use change to future conditions of fish habitat. Supported by NFHAP.  Learn more »  

Why Selected

The models under development by NFHAP may be particularly useful in predicting the impact of climate, land use change, and potential conservation strategies on fish communities. Previous model versions are already incorporated in the SALCC funded Optimal Conservation Strategies project  

Products

In progress

Assessment of future change of fish communities

TARGET COMPLETION DATE: UNDEFINED/UNDEFINED

National assessment of how fish communities will respond to climate and land use change
By |August 13th, 2015|Comments Off on National assessment of fish habitat, land use, and climate

Date Started

01/1970

Target Completion

01/1970
NPScape
NPScape

Full Title

NPScape

Contact

Bill Monahan
bill_monahan@nps.gov

Overview

At its core, NPScape delivers a suite of landscape dynamics measures that are considered integral to natural resource management and planning. Current NPScape measures fall into six major categories (population, housing, roads, land cover, pattern, and conservation status) that broadly address the e...At its core, NPScape delivers a suite of landscape dynamics measures that are considered integral to natural resource management and planning. Current NPScape measures fall into six major categories (population, housing, roads, land cover, pattern, and conservation status) that broadly address the environmental drivers, natural attributes, and conservation context of National Parks and other neighboring lands.  Learn more »  

Why Selected

This effort collects a broad array of GIS data on landscape dynamics that covers the entire South Atlantic LCC geography  

Products

Ready for download

Collection of GIS data related to landscape dynamics

measures include human population - housing - roads - land cover - pattern - and conservation status  Completed 08/2010.
By |August 12th, 2015|Comments Off on NPScape

Date Started

01/1970

Target Completion

01/1970