Stephanie Worley Firley

/Stephanie Worley Firley
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About Stephanie Worley Firley

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So far Stephanie Worley Firley has created 7 blog entries.

Could increasing climate variability usher in “the Age of the Mediocre Forest?”

In 2001, when large numbers of red spruce trees began dying atop Mt. Mitchell in western North Carolina, U.S Forest Service researchers stepped in to investigate. During the four years before the researchers’ arrival, unusual drought and abnormally high air temperatures combined with acid rain pollution and a rare outbreak of southern pine beetles to [...]

By |July 9th, 2014|Member Blog|Comments Off on Could increasing climate variability usher in “the Age of the Mediocre Forest?”

When it rains, it pours…and increases soil erosion potential in a changing climate

Anyone who has seen a gully carved by water flowing over land or a muddied creek following a rainstorm has witnessed soil erosion. Beyond its messiness, water-caused soil erosion can have far reaching impacts. When nutrients and organic matter in soils are washed away, decreased soil fertility affects food production, sediment entering streams and rivers [...]

By |June 30th, 2014|Member Blog|Comments Off on When it rains, it pours…and increases soil erosion potential in a changing climate

Cogongrass invades the South

It grows on every continent except Antarctica and has earned a reputation as one of the worst weeds on earth. Now, according to U.S. Forest Service emeritus scientist Jim Miller, cogongrass (Imperata cylindrica) is one of the most threatening invasive species in the South. Native to Southeast Asia, cogongrass was accidentally introduced in the United [...]

By |June 25th, 2014|Member Blog|Comments Off on Cogongrass invades the South

Does carbon in wetland soils go with the flow?

Among the various providers of ecosystem services, forested wetlands might be the champions. With their sponge-like abilities, they supply and purify water, protect communities from flooding, offer habitat for diverse species, produce timber and other goods, and present many opportunities for recreation and general enjoyment. Hidden in wetland soils is another critically important benefit: storage [...]

By |April 7th, 2014|Member Blog|Comments Off on Does carbon in wetland soils go with the flow?

The Climate Change Wildcard: Research Improves Odds for Sustaining Future Forests

As climate conditions change, tree species will have to “adapt, move, or die,” says Kevin Potter, a North Carolina State University scientist working with the USDA Forest Service Eastern Forest Environmental Threat Assessment Center. Trees can and do move their ranges over time in response to changing environments, but the process is relatively slow. A [...]

By |May 9th, 2013|Member Blog|Comments Off on The Climate Change Wildcard: Research Improves Odds for Sustaining Future Forests

Science Communication: Let Me Count the Ways

If you happened to be in downtown Raleigh, NC, during the last week of October, you may have noticed that Sir Walter Raleigh—that is, the 11-ft. bronze statue of him that stands in front of the Convention Center—was donning a giant lab coat. This was to welcome attendees of the 2012 Science Writers conference, which [...]

By |November 30th, 2012|Member Blog|Comments Off on Science Communication: Let Me Count the Ways

Forest and Grassland Carbon Course for Land Managers Now Available

Forest and Grassland Carbon in North America: a short course for land managers is now available on DVD and online through the USDA Forest Service Climate Change Resource Center (CCRC). The course features 15 presentations that provide public and private land managers with information on the science, management, and policy of forest and grassland carbon. [...]

By |August 29th, 2012|Member Blog|Comments Off on Forest and Grassland Carbon Course for Land Managers Now Available